Phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroup I reveals distinct domains of prehistoric gene flow in europe.

@article{Rootsi2004PhylogeographyOY,
  title={Phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroup I reveals distinct domains of prehistoric gene flow in europe.},
  author={Siiri Rootsi and Chiara Magri and Toomas Kivisild and Giorgia Benuzzi and Hela Help and Marina A. Bermisheva and Ildus Kutuev and Lovorka Bar{\'a}c and Marijana Peri{\vc}i{\'c} and Oleg P. Balanovsky and Andrey Pshenichnov and Danielle Dion and Monica A. Grobei and Lev A. Zhivotovsky and Vincenza Battaglia and Alessandro Achilli and Nadia Al-Zahery and Jüri Parik and Roy J. King and Cengiz Cinnioğlu and Elsa K. Khusnutdinova and Pavao Rudan and Elena V. Balanovska and Wolfgang Scheffrahn and Maya Simonescu and Ant{\'o}nio Brehm and Rita Gonçalves and Alexandra Rosa and Jean Paul Moisan and Andr{\'e} Chaventr{\'e} and Vladim{\'i}r Fer{\'a}k and S{\'a}ndor F{\"u}redi and Peter J. Oefner and Peidong Shen and Lars Beckman and Ilia Mikerezi and Rifet Terzi{\'c} and Dragan Primorac and Anne Cambon-Thomsen and Astrīda Krūmiņa and Antonio Torroni and Peter A. Underhill and A. Silvana Santachiara‐Benerecetti and Richard Villems and Ornella Semino},
  journal={American journal of human genetics},
  year={2004},
  volume={75 1},
  pages={
          128-37
        }
}
To investigate which aspects of contemporary human Y-chromosome variation in Europe are characteristic of primary colonization, late-glacial expansions from refuge areas, Neolithic dispersals, or more recent events of gene flow, we have analyzed, in detail, haplogroup I (Hg I), the only major clade of the Y phylogeny that is widespread over Europe but virtually absent elsewhere. The analysis of 1,104 Hg I Y chromosomes, which were identified in the survey of 7,574 males from 60 population… 

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Y-Chromosome haplogroup I prehistoric gene flow in Europe
To investigate which aspects of contemporary human Y-chromosome variation in Europe are characteristic of primary colonization, late-glacial expansions from refuge areas, Neolithic dispersals or more
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