Phylogeny of the parasitic plant family Orobanchaceae inferred from phytochrome A.

@article{Bennett2006PhylogenyOT,
  title={Phylogeny of the parasitic plant family Orobanchaceae inferred from phytochrome A.},
  author={Jonathan R. Bennett and Sarah Mathews},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2006},
  volume={93 7},
  pages={
          1039-51
        }
}
Partial sequences of the nuclear gene encoding the photoreceptor phytochrome A (PHYA) are used to reconstruct relationships within Orobanchaceae, the largest of the parasitic angiosperm families. The monophyly of Orobanchaceae, including nonphotosynthetic holoparasites, hemiparasites, and nonparasitic Lindenbergia is strongly supported. Phytochrome A data resolve six well-supported lineages that contain all of the sampled genera except Brandisia, which is sister to the major radiation of… 

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