Phylogeny of the large extinct South American Canids (Mammalia, Carnivora, Canidae) using a “total evidence” approach

@article{Prevosti2010PhylogenyOT,
  title={Phylogeny of the large extinct South American Canids (Mammalia, Carnivora, Canidae) using a “total evidence” approach},
  author={Francisco Juan Prevosti},
  journal={Cladistics},
  year={2010},
  volume={26}
}
South America currently possesses a high diversity of canids, comprising mainly small to medium‐sized omnivorous species, but in the Pleistocene there were large hypercarnivorous taxa that were assigned to Protocyon spp., Theriodictis spp., Canis gezi, Canis nehringi and Canis dirus. These fossils have never been included in phylogenies based on quantitative cladistics, but hand‐constructed cladograms published in the 1980s included some of them in the South American canine clade and others in… 
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