Phylogeny and evolution of sexually selected tail ornamentation in widowbirds and bishops (Euplectes spp.)

@article{Prager2009PhylogenyAE,
  title={Phylogeny and evolution of sexually selected tail ornamentation in widowbirds and bishops (Euplectes spp.)},
  author={Maria Prager and Staffan Andersson},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={22}
}
  • M. Prager, S. Andersson
  • Published 1 October 2009
  • Environmental Science, Biology
  • Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Despite similar ecology, mating systems and female preferences for supernormal tails, the 17 species of African widowbirds and bishops (Euplectes spp.) show astonishing variation in male tail ornamentation. Whereas bishops retain their brown nonbreeding tails in nuptial plumage, widowbirds grow black nuptial tails, varying in length from a few centimetres in E. axillaris to the extreme half metre train of E. progne. Here, we phylogenetically reconstruct the evolution of the discrete trait… 
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