Phylogeny, diet, and habitat of an extinct ground sloth from Cuchillo Curá, Neuquén Province, southwest Argentina

@article{Hofreiter2003PhylogenyDA,
  title={Phylogeny, diet, and habitat of an extinct ground sloth from Cuchillo Cur{\'a}, Neuqu{\'e}n Province, southwest Argentina},
  author={Michael Hofreiter and Julio L. Betancourt and Alicia Pelliza Sbriller and Vera Markgraf and H. Gregory McDonald},
  journal={Quaternary Research},
  year={2003},
  volume={59},
  pages={364 - 378}
}
Abstract Advancements in ancient DNA analyses now permit comparative molecular and morphological studies of extinct animal dung commonly preserved in caves of semiarid regions. [...] Key Result Phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial DNA show that the dung originated from a small ground sloth species not yet represented by skeletal material in the region, and not closely related to any of the four previously sequenced extinct and extant sloth species.Expand
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