Phylogenomics reveals the evolutionary timing and pattern of butterflies and moths

@article{Kawahara2019PhylogenomicsRT,
  title={Phylogenomics reveals the evolutionary timing and pattern of butterflies and moths},
  author={A. Kawahara and David Plotkin and M. Espeland and K. Meusemann and Emmanuel F. A. Toussaint and A. Donath and France Gimnich and P. B. Frandsen and A. Zwick and M. dos Reis and J. Barber and R. Peters and Shanlin Liu and X. Zhou and C. Mayer and L. Podsiadlowski and Caroline G Storer and J. Yack and B. Misof and Jesse W. Breinholt},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2019},
  volume={116},
  pages={22657 - 22663}
}
Significance Lepidoptera play key roles in many biological systems. Butterflies are hypothesized to have evolved contemporaneously with flowering plants, and moths are thought to have gained anti-bat defenses in response to echolocating predatory bats, but these hypotheses have largely gone untested. Using a transcriptomic, dated evolutionary tree of Lepidoptera, we demonstrate that the most recent common ancestor of Lepidoptera is considerably older than previously hypothesized. The oldest… Expand
Museomics: Phylogenomics of the Moth Family Epicopeiidae (Lepidoptera) Using Target Enrichment
Billions of specimens can be found in natural history museum collections around the world, holding potential molecular secrets to be unveiled. Among them are intriguing specimens of rare familiesExpand
The origins of flowering plants and pollinators
TLDR
New research raises questions about when flowering plants and their pollinators evolved, and when angiosperms originated is key to understanding the origin and evolution of pollinators, particularly insects. Expand
Extraordinary diversification of the “bristle flies” (Diptera: Tachinidae) and its underlying causes
The family Tachinidae (“bristle flies”) is the most diverse and ecologically important group of insect parasitoids outside the parasitic wasps. It is among the most species rich families of fliesExpand
Are fleas highly modified Mecoptera? Phylogenomic resolution of Antliophora (Insecta: Holometabola)
TLDR
It seems possible that fleas represent the most-species rich group of modern mecopterans and that their parasitic lifestyle and morphological adaptations have simply made them unrecognizable in respect to their order-level classification. Expand
Disentangling lousy relationships: comparative phylogenomics of two sucking louse lineages parasitizing chipmunks.
TLDR
In the context of host associations, each louse lineage has a different evolutionary history, supporting the hypothesis that host-parasite assemblages vary both across the landscape and with the taxa under investigation. Expand
A new target capture phylogeny elucidates the systematics and evolution of wing coupling in sack‐bearer moths
  • Ryan A. St Laurent, Carlos G. C. Mielke, D. Herbin, Kelly M. Dexter, Akito Y. Kawahara
  • Biology
  • 2020
TLDR
The frenulum has historically been used as an important character for intrafamilial classification in Mimallonidae, but the results conclusively show that this character system is more variable than previously thought. Expand
A novel reference dated phylogeny for the genus Spodoptera Guenée (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Noctuinae): new insights into the evolution of a pest-rich genus.
TLDR
The results provide an updated phylogenetic framework for 28 Spodoptera species, identifying two well-supported ecologically diverse clades that are recovered for the first time and suggesting an earlier origin than previously thought for the genus: about 17-18 million years ago. Expand
Refining the phylogeny of Crambidae with complete sampling of subfamilies (Lepidoptera, Pyraloidea)
TLDR
This work presents the first molecular phylogeny of Crambidae including all subfamilies and most tribes, and recovers topologies mostly agreeing with those of previous studies, with several groupings showing better support. Expand
Evolutionary trade-offs between male secondary sexual traits revealed by a phylogeny of the hyperdiverse tribe Eumaeini (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)
TLDR
A comprehensive, time-calibrated phylogeny is infer from 379 loci for 187 species representing 91% of the 87 described genera of Eumaeini, highlighting the potential role of sexual selection spurring diversification in this lineage. Expand
Adaptive shifts underlie the divergence in wing morphology in bombycoid moths
TLDR
It is suggested that after the evolution of flapping flight, diversification ofWing morphology can be potentiated by adaptative shifts, shaping the diversity of wing morphology across insects. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 193 REFERENCES
Phylogenomics provides strong evidence for relationships of butterflies and moths
TLDR
This work presents the first robust, transcriptome-based tree of Lepidoptera that strongly contradicts historical placement of butterflies, and provides an evolutionary framework for genomic, developmental and ecological studies on this diverse insect order. Expand
Timing and Patterns in the Taxonomic Diversification of Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
TLDR
It is found that the diversification of major lineages in Lepidoptera are approximately equal in age to the crown group of angiosperms and that there appear to have been three significant increases in diversification rates among Lepidioptera over evolutionary time. Expand
Diel behavior in moths and butterflies: a synthesis of data illuminates the evolution of temporal activity
TLDR
It is predicted that roughly 75-85% of Lepidoptera are nocturnal, and literature on the activity of micro-moths is significantly lacking, and the three frequently used terms for activity in animals are defined. Expand
A Triassic-Jurassic window into the evolution of Lepidoptera
TLDR
An assemblage of fossilized wing scales recovered from latest Triassic and earliest Jurassic sediments from northern Germany provides the earliest evidence for Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies), and diverse scales confirm a (Late) Triassic radiation of lepidopteran lineages, including the divergence of the Glossata. Expand
Evolutionary History of the Hymenoptera
TLDR
The results reveal that the extant sawfly diversity is largely the result of a previously unrecognized major radiation of phytophagous Hymenoptera that did not lead to wood-dwelling and parasitoidism. Expand
Comprehensive gene and taxon coverage elucidates radiation patterns in moths and butterflies
TLDR
A rigorous and comprehensive analysis of lepidopteran affinities found Ditrysia to be a monophyletic taxon with the clade Tischerioidea + Palaephatoidea being the sister group of it and Butterflies were found to be more closely related to ‘microlepidopterans’ groups of moths rather than the clades Macrolepidoptera, where they have traditionally been placed. Expand
Toward reconstructing the evolution of advanced moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera: Ditrysia): an initial molecular study
TLDR
The results corroborate the broad outlines of the current working phylogenetic hypothesis for Ditrysia, demonstrate that some prominent features of that hypothesis, including the position of the butterflies, need revision, and resolve the majority of family and subfamily relationships within superfamilies as thus far sampled. Expand
Phylogenomics and the evolution of hemipteroid insects
TLDR
The results indicated that thrips (Thysanoptera) are the closest living relatives of true bugs and allies (Hemiptera) and that hemipteroid insects started diversifying before the Carboniferous period, over 365 million years ago. Expand
Can RNA-Seq Resolve the Rapid Radiation of Advanced Moths and Butterflies (Hexapoda: Lepidoptera: Apoditrysia)? An Exploratory Study
TLDR
The potential of next-generation sequencing to conclusively resolve apoditrysian relationships is explored and high support was seen at only 2 of 11 deeper nodes among the “lower”, non-obtectomeran apod itrysians, which represent a much harder phylogenetic problem. Expand
Phylotranscriptomics resolves ancient divergences in the Lepidoptera
TLDR
A greatly expanded gene sampling of RNA‐Seq is brought to bear on nonditrysian phylogeny, recovering a novel hypothesis for early glossatan relationships that is the most strongly supported to date. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...