Phylogenomics resolves the timing and pattern of insect evolution

@article{Misof2014PhylogenomicsRT,
  title={Phylogenomics resolves the timing and pattern of insect evolution},
  author={Bernhard Misof and Shanlin Liu and Karen Meusemann and Ralph S. Peters and Alexander Donath and Christoph Mayer and Paul B. Frandsen and Jessica L. Ware and Tom{\'a}{\vs} Flouri and Rolf Beutel and Oliver Niehuis and Malte Petersen and Fernando Izquierdo-Carrasco and Torsten Wappler and Jes Rust and Andre J. Aberer and Ulrike Asp{\"o}ck and Horst Asp{\"o}ck and Daniela Bartel and Alexander Blanke and Simon A. Berger and Alexander B{\"o}hm and Thomas R. Buckley and Brett Calcott and Junqing Chen and Frank Friedrich and Makiko Fukui and Mari Fujita and Carola Greve and Peter Grobe and Shengchang Gu and Ying Huang and Lars S. Jermiin and Akito Y. Kawahara and Lars Krogmann and Martin Kubiak and Robert Lanfear and Harald Letsch and Yiyuan Li and Zhenyu Li and Jiguang Li and Haorong Lu and Ryuichiro Machida and Yuta Mashimo and Pashalia Kapli and Duane D. McKenna and Guanliang Meng and Yasutaka Nakagaki and Jos{\'e} Luis Navarrete-Heredia and Michael Ott and Yan Ou and G{\"u}nther Pass and Lars Podsiadlowski and Hans Pohl and Bj{\"o}rn Marcus von Reumont and Kai Sch{\"u}tte and Kaoru Sekiya and Shota Shimizu and Adam Ślipiński and Alexandros Stamatakis and Wenhui Song and Xu Su and Nikolaus U Szucsich and Meihua Tan and Xuemei Tan and Min Tang and Jingbo Tang and Gerald Timelthaler and Shigekazu Tomizuka and Michelle Trautwein and Xiao-li Tong and Toshiki Uchifune and Manfred G. Walzl and Brian M. Wiegmann and Jeanne Wilbrandt and Benjamin Wipfler and Thomas K. F. Wong and Qiong Wu and Gengxiong Wu and Yinlong Xie and Shenzhou Yang and Qing Yang and David K. Yeates and Kazunori Yoshizawa and Qing Zhang and Rui Zhang and Wenwei Zhang and Yunhui Zhang and Jing Zhao and Chengran Zhou and Lili Zhou and Tanja Ziesmann and Shijie Zou and Yingrui Li and Xun Xu and Yong Zhang and Huanming Yang and Jian Wang and Jun Joelle Wang and Karl M. Kjer and Xin Zhou},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={346},
  pages={763 - 767}
}
Insects are the most speciose group of animals, but the phylogenetic relationships of many major lineages remain unresolved. [...] Key Result Phylogenomic analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences, with site-specific nucleotide or domain-specific amino acid substitution models, produced statistically robust and congruent results resolving previously controversial phylogenetic relations hips.Expand
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