Phylogenomics of the superfamily Dytiscoidea (Coleoptera: Adephaga) with an evaluation of phylogenetic conflict and systematic error.

@article{Vasilikopoulos2019PhylogenomicsOT,
  title={Phylogenomics of the superfamily Dytiscoidea (Coleoptera: Adephaga) with an evaluation of phylogenetic conflict and systematic error.},
  author={Alexandros Vasilikopoulos and Michael Balke and Rolf Beutel and Alexander Donath and Lars Podsiadlowski and James M. Pflug and Robert M. Waterhouse and Karen Meusemann and Ralph S. Peters and Hermes E Escalona and Christoph Mayer and Shanlin Liu and Lars Hendrich and Yves Alarie and David T. Bilton and Feng-long Jia and Xin Zhou and David R Maddison and Oliver Niehuis and Bernhard Misof},
  journal={Molecular phylogenetics and evolution},
  year={2019},
  volume={135},
  pages={
          270-285
        }
}
The beetle superfamily Dytiscoidea, placed within the suborder Adephaga, comprises six families. The phylogenetic relationships of these families, whose species are aquatic, remain highly contentious. In particular the monophyly of the geographically disjunct Aspidytidae (China and South Africa) remains unclear. Here we use a phylogenomic approach to demonstrate that Aspidytidae are indeed monophyletic, as we inferred this phylogenetic relationship from analyzing nucleotide sequence data… Expand
Data curation and modeling of compositional heterogeneity in insect phylogenomics: a case study of the phylogeny of Dytiscoidea (Coleoptera: Adephaga).
TLDR
This work re-analyzes recently published phylogenomic datasets for Dytiscoidea, using approaches to reduce compositional heterogeneity and adopting a site-heterogeneous mixture model, and obtains a consistent, well-resolved, and strongly supported tree. Expand
Phylogenomic analyses clarify the pattern of evolution of Adephaga (Coleoptera) and highlight phylogenetic artefacts due to model misspecification and excessive data trimming
Adephaga is the second largest suborder of Coleoptera and contains aquatic and terrestrial groups that are sometimes classified as Hydradephaga and Geadephaga, respectively. The phylogeneticExpand
Phylogenomic analysis of the beetle suborder Adephaga with comparison of tailored and generalized ultraconserved element probe performance
TLDR
This study presents the first in vitro test of a newly developed UCE probe set customized for use within Adephaga that includes both probes tailored specifically for the suborder, alongside generalized Coleoptera probes previously found to work in adephagan taxa. Expand
An integrative phylogenomic approach to elucidate the evolutionary history and divergence times of Neuropterida (Insecta: Holometabola)
TLDR
An extensive phylogenomic analyses consolidate several key aspects in the backbone phylogeny of Neuropterida, such as the basal placement of Coniopterygidae within Neuroptera and the monophyly of Osmyloidea, and provide new insights into the timing of diversification of neuropterida. Expand
Anchored Phylogenomics, Evolution and Systematics of Elateridae: Are All Bioluminescent Elateroidea Derived Click Beetles?
TLDR
This study used anchored hybrid enrichment—designed to recover DNA sequences from hundreds of single-copy orthologous genes—to resolve the phylogeny of the Elateridae and establish their placement within superfamily Elateroidea and demonstrates that the click-beetle lineage contains not only pest wireworms, but also many species that benefit agriculture. Expand
Integrative phylogenomics reveals a Permian origin of Adephaga beetles
Beetles are arguably the most diverse group of animals on Earth with over 400 000 described species. Yet the timing of main diversification events among these insects remains debated. The use ofExpand
The limits of Quediini at last (Staphylinidae: Staphylininae): a rove beetle mega‐radiation resolved by comprehensive sampling and anchored phylogenomics
Rove beetles of the tribe Quediini are abundant predators in humid microhabitats of forested, open, synanthropic or subterranean ecosystems, with just over 800 species distributed across theExpand
Combining molecular datasets with strongly heterogeneous taxon coverage enlightens the peculiar biogeographic history of stoneflies (Insecta: Plecoptera)
Extant members of the ancient insect order of stoneflies exhibit a disjunct, antitropical distribution, with one major lineage exclusively occurring in the Southern Hemisphere and the other, with fewExpand
Phylogenomic relationships of bioluminescent elateroids define the ‘lampyroid’ clade with clicking Sinopyrophoridae as its earliest member
TLDR
It is suggested that bioluminescence was not present in the most recent common ancestor of Elateridae and the lampyroid clade and it evolved among this group with some delay, at the latest in the mid‐Cretaceous period, presumably in eastern Laurasia. Expand
Phylogenomics of parasitic and non-parasitic lice (Insecta: Psocodea): Combining sequence data and Exploring compositional bias solutions in Next Generation Datasets.
TLDR
A phylogenomic analysis on the order Psocodea utilizing both transcriptome and genome sequencing and a dating analysis, with internal nodes calibrated by fossil evidence, suggests an origin of parasitism that predates the K-Pg boundary, allowing a stable ordinal level classification scheme to be proposed. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 161 REFERENCES
Molecular phylogeny of the highly disjunct cliff water beetles from South Africa and China (Coleoptera: Aspidytidae)
TLDR
A re-examination of larval characters in the two aspidytid species revealed that the larva of the Chinese species is strikingly similar to that of Amphizoidae, highlighting the need for more data to address dytiscoid phylogenetics, possibly involving a genomic approach. Expand
The systematic position of Aspidytidae, the diversification of Dytiscoidea (Coleoptera, Adephaga) and the phylogenetic signal of third codon positions
TLDR
There was a significant increase in the diversification rate at the base of the richest families (Noteridae and Dytiscidae), which could be associated with the development of simultaneous stroke and higher swimming performance, although data on the swimming behaviour of some basal groups of Noteridae are incomplete. Expand
The systematic position of Meruidae (Coleoptera, Adephaga) and the phylogeny of the smaller aquatic adephagan beetle families
A phylogenetic analysis of Adephaga is presented. It is based on 148 morphological characters of adults and larvae and focussed on a placement of the recently described Meruidae, and the genus‐levelExpand
A genus-level supertree of Adephaga (Coleoptera)
TLDR
A supertree for Adephaga was reconstructed based on 43 independent source trees – including cladograms based on Hennigian and numerical cladistic analyses of morphological and molecular data – and on a backbone taxonomy, making it the most comprehensive phylogenetic estimate yet published for the group. Expand
The mitogenome phylogeny of Adephaga (Coleoptera).
TLDR
Densely sampled mitogenomes, analyzed with site heterogeneous mixture models, support a plausible hypothesis of basal relationships in the Adephaga and reveal Cicindelidae, together with Trachypachidae, as sister to all other Geadephaga, supporting their status as Family. Expand
Systematic placement of the recently discovered beetle family Meruidae (Coleoptera: Dytiscoidea) based on molecular data
TLDR
DNA sequence data is used to place this enigmatic taxon relative to other aquatic groups in this suborder, and suggests a sister relationship of Meruidae + Noteridae, while parsimony analyses retrieve MeruidAE + Notomicrus (a basal noterid genus), which combined are the sister group of all remaining noteridae. Expand
Ultraconserved elements show utility in phylogenetic inference of Adephaga (Coleoptera) and suggest paraphyly of ‘Hydradephaga’
TLDR
The utility of UCEs for reconstructing the phylogeny of adephagan families, in the first in vitro application a UCE bait set in Coleoptera, is examined and the potential for further resolution of relationships within Adephaga is suggested using U CEs with improved taxon sampling, and by developing Adephagans‐specific probes. Expand
A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF AMPHIZOID BEETLES (AMPHIZOIDAE: COLEOPTERA) AND THEIR PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS TO OTHER ADEPHAGA
TLDR
Through cladistic analysis, using out-group and character correlation criteria, and a review of known Mesozoic fossil material, a hypothesis of phylogenetic relationships among extinct and extant Adephaga is developed, discussed, and related to geologic time. Expand
On the phylogeny and evolution of Mesozoic and extant lineages of Adephaga (Coleoptera, Insecta)
TLDR
The relationships of extant and extinct lineages of Adephaga were analysed formally for the first time and possible reasons for the extinction of †Coptoclavidae are the rise of teleost fish and the competition of Gyrinidae and Dytiscidae, which possess efficient defensive glands and larval mandibular sucking channels. Expand
Phylogenomic analysis of Apoidea sheds new light on the sister group of bees
TLDR
The phylogenetic analyses revealed that within the Apoidea, (eu)social societies evolved exclusively in a single clade that comprises pemphredonine and philanthine wasps as well as bees. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...