Phylogenetics, genome diversity and origin of modern leopard, Panthera pardus

@article{Uphyrkina2001PhylogeneticsGD,
  title={Phylogenetics, genome diversity and origin of modern leopard, Panthera pardus},
  author={Olga V Uphyrkina and Warren E. Johnson and Howard Quigley and Dale G. Miquelle and Laurie L. Marker and Mitch Bush and Stephen J. O'Brien},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2001},
  volume={10}
}
Leopards, Panthera pardus, are widely distributed across southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. [...] Key Result Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences (727 bp of NADH5 and control region) and 25 polymorphic microsatellite loci revealed abundant diversity that could be partitioned into a minimum of nine discrete populations, tentatively named here as revised subspecies: P. pardus pardus, P. p. nimr, P. p. saxicolor, P. p. fusca, P. p. kotiya, P. p. delacouri, P. p. japonensis, P. p. orientalis and…Expand
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