Phylogenetically balanced evidence for structural and carbon isotope responses in plants along elevational gradients

@article{Zhu2009PhylogeneticallyBE,
  title={Phylogenetically balanced evidence for structural and carbon isotope responses in plants along elevational gradients},
  author={Yuan Zhu and Rolf T W Siegwolf and Walter Durka and Christian K{\"o}rner},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2009},
  volume={162},
  pages={853-863}
}
We tested three hypotheses related to the functioning of mountain plants, namely their reproductive effort, leaf surface structure and effectiveness of CO2 assimilation, using archive material from contrasting elevations. Analysis of elevational trends is at risk of suffering from two major biases: a phylogenetic bias (i.e. an elevational change in the abundance of taxonomic groups), and covariation of different environmental drivers (e.g. water, temperature, atmospheric pressure), which do not… CONTINUE READING
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