Phylogenetic test of the molecular clock and linearized trees.

@article{Takezaki1995PhylogeneticTO,
  title={Phylogenetic test of the molecular clock and linearized trees.},
  author={Naoko Takezaki and Andrey Rzhetsky and Masatoshi Nei},
  journal={Molecular biology and evolution},
  year={1995},
  volume={12 5},
  pages={
          823-33
        }
}
To estimate approximate divergence times of species or species groups with molecular data, we have developed a method of constructing a linearized tree under the assumption of a molecular clock. We present two tests of the molecular clock for a given topology: two-cluster test and branch-length test. The two-cluster test examines the hypothesis of the molecular clock for the two lineages created by an interior node of the tree, whereas the branch-length test examines the deviation of the branch… Expand

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