Phylogenetic position of the ant genus Acropyga Roger (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and the evolution of trophophoresy.

@article{LaPolla2006PhylogeneticPO,
  title={Phylogenetic position of the ant genus Acropyga Roger (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and the evolution of trophophoresy.},
  author={John S LaPolla and Ted R. Schultz and Karl M. Kjer and Joseph F. Bischoff},
  journal={Insect systematics \& evolution},
  year={2006},
  volume={37 2},
  pages={
          197-212
        }
}
Trophophoresy is exhibited in two ant genera: Acropyga (Formicinae), in which all 37 species are thought to be trophophoretic, and Tetraponera (Pseudomyrmecinae), in which it has been observed in only one species, T. binghami. This study analyses a dataset comprised of both morphological and molecular (D2 region of 28S rRNA and EF1-alpha) data. Evidence is presented in favor of Acropyga being monophyletic, hence trophophoresy has evolved only once within the Formicinae and twice within the ants… 

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