Phylogenetic evidence for a flower size and number trade-off.

@article{Sargent2007PhylogeneticEF,
  title={Phylogenetic evidence for a flower size and number trade-off.},
  author={Risa D. Sargent and Carol Goodwillie and Susan Kalisz and Richard H. Ree},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2007},
  volume={94 12},
  pages={
          2059-62
        }
}
The size and number of flowers displayed together on an inflorescence (floral display) influences pollinator attraction and pollen transfer and receipt, and is integral to plant reproductive success and fitness. Life history theory predicts that the evolution of floral display is constrained by trade-offs between the size and number of flowers and inflorescences. Indeed, a trade-off between flower size and flower number is a key assumption of models of inflorescence architecture and the… 

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