Phylogenetic Support for a Specialized Clade of Cretaceous Enantiornithine Birds with Information from a New Species

@inproceedings{OConnor2009PhylogeneticSF,
  title={Phylogenetic Support for a Specialized Clade of Cretaceous Enantiornithine Birds with Information from a New Species},
  author={Jingmai K. O’Connor and Xuri Wang and Luis Mar{\'i}a Chiappe and Chunling Gao and Qingjin Meng and Xiaodong Cheng and Jinyuan Liu},
  year={2009}
}
ABSTRACT A new species of enantiornithine bird from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation of northeastern China is reported. The new taxon, Shanweiniao cooperorum, possesses several enantiornithine synapomorphies as well as the elongate rostral morphology (rostrum equal to or exceeding 60% the total length of the skull) of the Chinese early Cretaceous enantiornithines, Longipteryx chaoyangensis and Longirostravis hani. The discovery of this new specimen highlights the existence of a diverse… 
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TLDR
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