Phrenic nerve dysfunction after cardiac operations: electrophysiologic evaluation of risk factors.

@article{Dimopoulou1998PhrenicND,
  title={Phrenic nerve dysfunction after cardiac operations: electrophysiologic evaluation of risk factors.},
  author={I. Dimopoulou and M. Daganou and U. Dafni and A. Karakatsani and M. Khoury and S. Geroulanos and J. Jordanoglou},
  journal={Chest},
  year={1998},
  volume={113 1},
  pages={
          8-14
        }
}
BACKGROUND AND STUDY OBJECTIVE Phrenic nerve injury may occur after cardiac surgery; however, its cause has not been extensively investigated with electrophysiology. The purpose of this study was to determine by electrophysiologic means the importance of various possible risk factors in the development of phrenic nerve dysfunction after cardiac surgical operations. DESIGN A prospective study was conducted. SETTING A tertiary teaching hospital provided the background for the study… Expand
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