Photoprotection Beyond Ultraviolet Radiation: A Review of Tinted Sunscreens.

@article{Lyons2020PhotoprotectionBU,
  title={Photoprotection Beyond Ultraviolet Radiation: A Review of Tinted Sunscreens.},
  author={Alexis B. Lyons and Carles Trull{\`a}s and Indermeet Kohli and I. Hamzavi and Henry W. Lim},
  journal={Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology},
  year={2020}
}
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Suppression of Sunscreen Leakage in Water by Amyloid-like Protein Aggregates.
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Photoprotection against visible light: Implications for clinical practice
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There is enough evidence at present to highlight the harmful effects of VL and its implication upon several photodermatoses including chronic actinic dermatitis, cutaneous porphyrias and solar urticaria, in addition to hyperpigmentary disorders.
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