Photopigments and color vision in the nocturnal monkey,Aotus

@article{Jacobs1993PhotopigmentsAC,
  title={Photopigments and color vision in the nocturnal monkey,Aotus
},
  author={Gerald H. Jacobs and Jess F. Deegan and Jay Neitz and Michael Crognale and Maureen Neitz},
  journal={Vision Research},
  year={1993},
  volume={33},
  pages={1773-1783}
}

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