Phosphine on Venus Cannot Be Explained by Conventional Processes.

@article{Bains2021PhosphineOV,
  title={Phosphine on Venus Cannot Be Explained by Conventional Processes.},
  author={William Bains and Janusz Jurand Petkowski and Sara Seager and Sukrit Ranjan and Clara Sousa-Silva and Paul B. Rimmer and Zhuchang Zhan and J. S. Greaves and Anita M. S. Richards},
  journal={Astrobiology},
  year={2021}
}
The recent candidate detection of ∼1 ppb of phosphine in the middle atmosphere of Venus is so unexpected that it requires an exhaustive search for explanations of its origin. Phosphorus-containing species have not been modeled for Venus' atmosphere before, and our work represents the first attempt to model phosphorus species in the venusian atmosphere. We thoroughly explore the potential pathways of formation of phosphine in a venusian environment, including in the planet's atmosphere, cloud… 

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