Phosphatidylethanolamine has an essential role in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is independent of its ability to form hexagonal phase structures.

@article{Storey2001PhosphatidylethanolamineHA,
  title={Phosphatidylethanolamine has an essential role in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is independent of its ability to form hexagonal phase structures.},
  author={Mitchell Storey and Keith L. Clay and Tamara Kutateladze and Robert C. Murphy and Michael Overduin and Dennis R. Voelker},
  journal={The Journal of biological chemistry},
  year={2001},
  volume={276 51},
  pages={48539-48}
}
Two yeast enzymes, Psd1p and Psd2p, catalyze the decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine to produce phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn). Mitochondrial Psd1p provides approximately 90% of total cellular phosphatidylserine decarboxylase activity. When the PSD1 gene is deleted, the resultant strain (psd1Delta) grows normally at 30 degrees C in glucose and in the absence of exogenous choline or ethanolamine. However, at elevated temperature (37 degrees C) or on the nonfermentable carbon source lactate… CONTINUE READING