Phonetic Shifts in Algonquian Languages

@article{Michelson1935PhoneticSI,
  title={Phonetic Shifts in Algonquian Languages},
  author={Truman Michelson},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1935},
  volume={8},
  pages={131 - 171}
}
  • T. Michelson
  • Published 1 August 1935
  • Linguistics
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
It has been known for a very long time that the Arapaho group of languages consisted of Arapaho proper, Atsina, and a few other dialects. Specimens of Nanwaeiniahanan and Basanwfunenan have been published by Kroeber in his Arapaho Dialects, UC-PAAE, vol. 12:71-138; I have also heard the latter dialect. If Mooney wrongly identifies Nanwa0inahanan with Nanwuinenan, a designation of the Southern Arapaho, (14th Ann. Rept. Bur. Amer. Ethn. pt. 2, p. 955; article Arapaho, Bull. 30, Bur. Amer. Ethn… 
The Eastern Algonquian Subordinative Mode and the Importance of Morphology
  • I. Goddard
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1983
0. Introduction. The Eastern Algonquian languages have a mode, formally part of the independent order, that is used for the verb of sentential complements in certain constructions. The morphology
On the Naturalness of Algonquian ɬ
  • M. Picard
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1984
1. In his duly celebrated "Algonquian," Bloomfield set out to reconstruct Proto-Algonquian (PA) on the basis of the four best-known daughter languages, namely, Fox (F), Cree (C), Menominee (M), and
CLD: Software for analysis of Anishinaabemowin texts and recordings
‘Rounding dissimilation’ is the name for a sound change in Miami-Illinois already seen in the late seventeenth century records of the language. Rounding dissimilation is a process whereby
On the Structure of the Lower Numbers in Pre-PA
  • M. Picard
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1986
.1980. Consequential verbs in the Northern lroquoian languages and elsewhere. Papers in Honor of Madison S. Beeler, ed. K. Klar, M. Langdon, and S. Silver, pp. 43-49. The Hague: Mouton. .Forthcoming.
A Comment on the Yurok and Kalapuya Data in Greenberg's Language in the Americas
  • H. Berman
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1992
When I first saw Greenberg's Language in the Americas I turned to the cognate sets which included Yurok and Kalapuya, both of which I had worked on, to see how Greenberg had treated them. The results
The Case against Cheyenne n from PA *k
  • M. Picard
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1984
observations. In fact, since stress now falls in this word on the last syllable before the relative enclitic, this indicates a reanalysis into a prefix stem organization. If this is correct, it may
Cheyenne Pitch Rules
  • Wayne Leman
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1981
I Cheyenne, a member of the Algonquian language family, is spoken in central Oklahoma and on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation in southeastern Montana. The phonemes of Cheyenne are: p, t, k, ?, s, s,
The Historical Phonology of Munsee
  • I. Goddard
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1982
I Reconstructions that can be found in Aubin (1975) or are based on words or sources cited there are generally given without supporting forms. Otherwise the languages cited and their basic sources
The Origin of Cheyenne Pitch Accent
  • D. Frantz
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1972
1. A number of Algonkian languages have pitch-accent systems in which pitch functions as an accent or stress, though some investigators have referred to these as twotone systems in which each vowel
Arapaho Historical Morphology
Although the phonological innovations that derive Arapaho from Proto-Algonquian are extensive, the historical origins of Arapaho inflectional morphology can be traced in almost all cases. Some new
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
Cheyenne nad'mino'tu "I pass and leave him, her", derived from *nepapaminakaOawa, Cree, Kickapoo papami-, etc
    Cheyenne nanauts' "I sleep", based upon *nenepa, Fox nenepa (*nepa-has been largely extended at the expense of *nepa-in Cree, Algonkin, and Ojibwa; I established the variation years ago)