Phonetic Shifts in Algonquian Languages

@article{Michelson1935PhoneticSI,
  title={Phonetic Shifts in Algonquian Languages},
  author={T. Michelson},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1935},
  volume={8},
  pages={131 - 171}
}
  • T. Michelson
  • Published 1935
  • Sociology
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
It has been known for a very long time that the Arapaho group of languages consisted of Arapaho proper, Atsina, and a few other dialects. Specimens of Nanwaeiniahanan and Basanwfunenan have been published by Kroeber in his Arapaho Dialects, UC-PAAE, vol. 12:71-138; I have also heard the latter dialect. If Mooney wrongly identifies Nanwa0inahanan with Nanwuinenan, a designation of the Southern Arapaho, (14th Ann. Rept. Bur. Amer. Ethn. pt. 2, p. 955; article Arapaho, Bull. 30, Bur. Amer. Ethn… Expand
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References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
Cheyenne nad'mino'tu "I pass and leave him, her", derived from *nepapaminakaOawa, Cree, Kickapoo papami-, etc
    Cheyenne nanauts' "I sleep", based upon *nenepa, Fox nenepa (*nepa-has been largely extended at the expense of *nepa-in Cree, Algonkin, and Ojibwa; I established the variation years ago)