Phoenix - The First Mars Scout Mission

@article{Goldstein2008PhoenixT,
  title={Phoenix - The First Mars Scout Mission},
  author={Barry Goldstein and Robert F. Shotwell},
  journal={2008 IEEE Aerospace Conference},
  year={2008},
  pages={1-17}
}
As the first of the new Mars scouts missions, the Phoenix project was selected by NASA in August of 2003. Four years later, almost to the day, Phoenix was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station and successfully injected into an interplanetary trajectory on its way to Mars. This paper highlight some of the key changes since the 2006 IEEE paper of the same name, as well as activities, challenges and problems encountered on the way to the launch pad. Phoenix "Follows the water" responding… 
Mission design of the Phoenix Mars Scout mission
[1] The Phoenix Mars Scout Lander, the first robotic explorer in NASA's “Scout Program,” launched on 4 August 2007, will land on the northern plains of Mars in late May 2008, prior to the northern
Mission Design Overview for the Phoenix Mars Scout Mission
The Phoenix mission "follows the water" by landing in a region where NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter has discovered evidence of ice-rich soil very near the Martian surface. For three months after
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The 2007 Mars Phoenix Lander was launched in August of 2007 on a ten month cruise to reach the northern plains of Mars in May 2008. Its mission continues NASA’s pursuit to find evidence of water on
Mars Phoenix Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation Design and Modelling Analysis
The 2007 Mars Phoenix Lander was launched in August of 2007 on a ten month cruise to reach the northern plains of Mars in May 2008. Its mission continues NASA s pursuit to find evidence of water on
Telecommunications relay support of the Mars Phoenix Lander mission
TLDR
During the Phoenix surface mission, ODY and MRO provided command and telemetry services, far surpassing the original data return requirements, and the availability of MEX as a backup relay asset enhanced the robustness of the overall relay plan.
Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance of the Mars Phoenix Lander
On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander successfully landed on the northern arctic plains of Mars. An overview of a preliminary reconstruction analysis performed on each en-try, descent, and landing
The quality of the Mars Phoenix pressure data
Abstract The Phoenix lander operated on the surface of Mars for circa 5 months in 2008. One of its scientific instruments is an atmospheric pressure sensor called MET-P. We perform a comprehensive
Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance of the Mars Phoenix Lander
On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander successfully landed on the northern arctic plains of Mars. An overview of a preliminary reconstruction analysis performed on each entry, descent, and landing
Overview of the Phoenix Entry, Descent and Landing System Architecture
NASA s Phoenix Mars Lander began its journey to Mars from Cape Canaveral, Florida in August 2007, but its journey to the launch pad began many years earlier in 1997 as NASA s Mars Surveyor Program
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