Phineas Gage revisited: Modern management of large-calibre penetrating brain injury

@article{Mitchell2012PhineasGR,
  title={Phineas Gage revisited: Modern management of large-calibre penetrating brain injury},
  author={Bartley D. Mitchell and Benjamin Daniel Fox and William Edward Humphries and Ali Shalizar Jalali and Shankar P. Gopinath},
  journal={Trauma},
  year={2012},
  volume={14},
  pages={263 - 269}
}
We present the case of a 19-year-old man who suffered a penetrating injury to the brain with a large-calibre steel industrial prybar approximately 1 m long and 2.5 cm wide that was retained in his cranium. The management of this type of injury is discussed, based on our experience with penetrating brain injuries with large-calibre retained objects, from initial presentation to surgical removal of the object to post-operative care. Additionally, given the similarities of the injuries suffered by… 

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