Philosophy of Computer Science: An Introductory Course

@article{Rapaport2005PhilosophyOC,
  title={Philosophy of Computer Science: An Introductory Course},
  author={W. Rapaport},
  journal={Teaching Philosophy},
  year={2005},
  volume={28},
  pages={319-341}
}
There are many branches of philosophy called "the philosophy of X," where X = disciplines ranging from history to physics. The philosophy of artificial intelligence has a long history, and there are many courses and texts with that title. Surprisingly, the philosophy of computer science is not nearly as well-developed. This article proposes topics that might constitute the philosophy of computer science and describes a course covering those topics, along with suggested readings and assignments. 
The Philosophy of Computer Science
TLDR
An introduction to some of the philo-sophical issues that surround and underpin the academic discipline of computer science are provided. Expand
Know Your Discipline: Teaching the Philosophy of Computer Science
  • M. Tedre
  • Computer Science
  • J. Inf. Technol. Educ.
  • 2007
TLDR
The increased investments in research efforts in computer science have been paralleled by the growth of the number of computing-centered fields, such as computer engineering, scientific computation, electrical engineering, decision support systems, architectural design, and software engineering. Expand
A PHILOSOPY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSE FOR COMPUTING PRACTITIONERS
TLDR
It is a proper part of computer scientist's education to be aware of epistemological and methodological issues in computer science, and a course is included, in the curriculum, a course that deals with those issues—issues that fall in the do­ main of the philosophy of computer science. Expand
Computing as Empirical Science – Evolution of a Concept
TLDR
The evolution of philosophical and methodological considerations concerning empiricism in computer/computing science is presented and the most important current events in the history of reflection on computing are traced. Expand
Three Paradigms of Computer Science
TLDR
Evidence corroborating the tenets of the scientific paradigm, in particular the claim that program-processes are on a par with mental processes is demonstrated. Expand
The development of computer science: a sociocultural perspective
  • M. Tedre
  • Sociology, Computer Science
  • Baltic Sea '06
  • 2006
TLDR
It is argued that understanding of how computer science works is an important part of the knowledge of an educated computer scientist. Expand
What is a Computer? A Survey
  • W. Rapaport
  • Psychology, Computer Science
  • Minds and Machines
  • 2018
TLDR
A critical survey of some attempts to define ‘computer’, beginning with some informal ones, then critically evaluating those of three philosophers (J.R. Searle, P. Hayes, and G. Piccinini), and concluding with an examination of whether the brain and the universe are computers. Expand
What a course on philosophy of computing is not
1. Learning goals This programmatic paper is trying to contribute to the development of an international course in the philosophy of computing, the main outlines of which were discussed at NA-CAPExpand
Computing as a Science: A Survey of Competing Viewpoints
  • M. Tedre
  • Psychology, Computer Science
  • Minds and Machines
  • 2011
TLDR
The article argues that much of the discussion about the scientific nature of computing is misguided due to a deep conceptual uncertainty about science in general as well as computing in particular. Expand
On the Relation of Computing to the World
I survey a common theme that pervades the philosophy of computer science (and philosophy more generally): the relation of computing to the world. Are algorithms merely certain procedures entirelyExpand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 462 REFERENCES
Three Myths of Computer Science
  • J. Moor
  • Computer Science
  • The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science
  • 1978
TLDR
A basic concept of computer science is discussed-the concept of a computer program-and three related distinctions ofComputer science-software vs. hardware, digital vs. analogue, and model vs. theory are discussed. Expand
Computer Science and its Relation to Mathematics
  • D. Knuth
  • Computer Science, Mathematics
  • 1974
TLDR
A personal view of how this subject interacts with Mathematics is given, by discussing the similarities and differences between the two fields, and by examining some of the ways in which they help each other. Expand
Computer Science and Philosophy
“Computer science and philosophy? Isn’t that sort of an odd combination?” Such is the typical cocktail-party response when learning of my academic training in the discipline Socrates called “the loveExpand
Computing as a discipline
A summary is given of a report that had the following goals: to describe computer science in a way that emphasizes fundamental questions and significant accomplishments; to propose a teachingExpand
Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction
TLDR
The book examines a wide range of areas of technology, including the digital revolution, the Web and Internet, Artificial Intelligence and CD-ROMS, and outlines the what the future philosophy of information will need to undertake. Expand
An axiomatic basis for computer programming
In this paper an attempt is made to explore the logical foundations of computer programming by use of techniques which were first applied in the study of geometry and have later been extended toExpand
Computer science as empirical inquiry: symbols and search
TLDR
Computer science is the study of the phenomena surrounding computers; the machine—not just the hardware, but the programmed, living machine—is the organism the authors study. Expand
Software, Abstraction, And Ontology
This paper analyzes both philosophical and practical assumptions underlying claims for the dual nature of software, including software as a machine made of text, and software as a concreteExpand
Artificial Intelligence
TLDR
The history, the major landmarks, and some of the controversies in each of these twelve topics are discussed, as well as some predictions about the course of future research. Expand
Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
TLDR
Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs emphasizes the central role played by different approaches to dealing with time in computational models, appropriate for an introduction to computer science courses, as well as programming languages and program design. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...