Philopatry and habitat selection in Bull-headed and Brown shrikes

@inproceedings{Takagi2003PhilopatryAH,
  title={Philopatry and habitat selection in Bull-headed and Brown shrikes},
  author={Masaoki Takagi},
  year={2003}
}
Abstract Philopatry and habitat selection were examined for migratory populations of the two sympatric shrike species, the Bull-headed (Lanius bucephalus) and Brown (L. cristatus) shrikes in northern Japan between 1992 and 1997. Although 18% of banded Bull-headed Shrike males returned to the previous breeding area, no female did. In Brown Shrikes, 43% and 13% of banded males and females, respectively, returned to the area. Brown Shrikes are significantly more philopatric than Bull-headed… Expand
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