Phillipsite and Al-tobermorite mineral cements produced through low-temperature water-rock reactions in Roman marine concrete

@article{Jackson2017PhillipsiteAA,
  title={Phillipsite and Al-tobermorite mineral cements produced through low-temperature water-rock reactions in Roman marine concrete},
  author={M. D. Jackson and S. Mulcahy and H. Chen and Yao Li and Q. Li and P. Cappelletti and H. Wenk},
  journal={American Mineralogist},
  year={2017},
  volume={102},
  pages={1435 - 1450}
}
Abstract Pozzolanic reaction of volcanic ash with hydrated lime is thought to dominate the cementing fabric and durability of 2000-year-old Roman harbor concrete. Pliny the Elder, however, in first century CE emphasized rock-like cementitious processes involving volcanic ash (pulvis) “that as soon as it comes into contact with the waves of the sea and is submerged becomes a single stone mass (fierem unum lapidem), impregnable to the waves and every day stronger” (Naturalis Historia 35.166… Expand
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