Pheromones: Exploitation of gut bacteria in the locust

@article{Dillon2000PheromonesEO,
  title={Pheromones: Exploitation of gut bacteria in the locust},
  author={Rod Dillon and C. Vennard and Anthony Keith Charnley},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2000},
  volume={403},
  pages={851-851}
}
The congregation of locusts into vast swarms can cause crop devastation of biblical proportions. Here we show that guaiacol, a key component of a pheromone derived from locust faecal pellets that promotes the aggregation of locusts, is produced by bacteria in the locust gut. This adaptation by an insect to exploit a common metabolite produced by indigenous gut bacteria has wide implications for our appreciation of the role of the gut microbiota in insects. 
A Note: Gut bacteria produce components of a locust cohesion pheromone
Aims: Faecal pellets from germ‐free locusts were used as culture media to determine the ability of locust gut bacteria to synthesize phenolic components of the locust cohesion pheromone.
The gut bacteria of insects: nonpathogenic interactions.
TLDR
The intestinal bacteria is discussed in the context of developing understanding of symbiotic relationships, of multitrophic interactions between insects and plant or animal host, and in developing new strategies for controlling insect pests.
An overview of locust pheromones
TLDR
Improving understanding of locust pheromones is not only of theoretical significance but may also allow us to make use of these compounds to artificially mediate the behavior,or other biological characteristics,of locusts.
The maternal foam plug constitutes a reservoir for the desert locust’s bacterial symbionts
TLDR
Evidence of the vertical transmission of locust gut bacteria is provided using comparative 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and direct experiments with engineered bacteria, which reveals a potential vector for the transgenerational transmission of symbionts in locusts, which contributes to the locust swarm's ability to invade and survive in new territories.
The maternal foam plug constitutes a reservoir for the desert locust's bacterial symbionts.
TLDR
Using comparative 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and direct experiments with engineered bacteria, evidence is provided for vertical transmission of locust gut bacteria, revealing a potential vector for the transgenerational transmission of symbionts in locusts, which contributes to the locust swarm's ability to invade and survive in new territories.
Pyrazines from bacteria and ants: convergent chemistry within an ecological niche
TLDR
It is found that L-threonine induces the bacterial production of the trail pheromone pyrazines, which are common for the host leaf-cutter ants, and a biosynthetic pathway was proposed.
Locust Bacterial Symbionts: An Update
TLDR
The current state of knowledge of the locust–bacteria interactions is described, as well as highlighting some newly-gained understanding; and some new perspectives for future research are offered.
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