Phenotypic diversity of Flo protein family-mediated adhesion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

@article{VanMulders2009PhenotypicDO,
  title={Phenotypic diversity of Flo protein family-mediated adhesion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.},
  author={Sebastiaan E. Van Mulders and Els Christianen and Sofie M. G. Saerens and Luk Daenen and Pieter J. Verbelen and Ronnie G. Willaert and Kevin J. Verstrepen and Freddy R. Delvaux},
  journal={FEMS yeast research},
  year={2009},
  volume={9 2},
  pages={
          178-90
        }
}
The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes a Flo (flocculin) adhesin family responsible for cell-cell and cell-surface adherence. In commonly used laboratory strains, these FLO genes are transcriptionally silent, because of a nonsense mutation in the transcriptional activator FLO8, concealing the potential phenotypic diversity of fungal adhesion. Here, we analyse the distinct adhesion characteristics conferred by each of the five FLO genes in the S288C strain and compare these phenotypes with… 

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