Phenotypic characterization of Salmonella isolated from food production environments associated with low-water activity foods.

Abstract

Salmonella can survive for extended periods of time in low-moisture environments posing a challenge for modern food production. This dangerous pathogen must be controlled throughout the production chain with a minimal risk of dissemination. Limited information is currently available describing the behavior and characteristics of this important zoonotic foodborne bacterium in low-moisture food production environments and in food. In our study, the phenotypes related to low-moisture survival of 46 Salmonella isolates were examined. Most of the isolates in the collection could form biofilms under defined laboratory conditions, with 57% being positive for curli fimbriae production and 75% of the collection positive for cellulose production, which are both linked with stronger biofilm formation. Biocides in the factory environment to manage hygiene were found to be most effective against planktonic cells but less so when the same bacteria were surface dried or present as a biofilm. Cellulose-producing isolates were better survivors when exposed to a biocide compared with cellulose-negative isolates. Examination of Salmonella growth of these 18 serotypes in NaCl, KCl, and glycerol found that glycerol was the least inhibitory of these three humectants. We identified a significant correlation between the ability to survive in glycerol and the ability to survive in KCl and biofilm formation, which may be important for food safety and the protection of public health.

DOI: 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-13-088

Cite this paper

@article{Finn2013PhenotypicCO, title={Phenotypic characterization of Salmonella isolated from food production environments associated with low-water activity foods.}, author={Sarah Finn and Jay C. D. Hinton and Peter Mcclure and Al{\'e}jandro Am{\'e}zquita and Marta S Martins and S{\'e}amus Fanning}, journal={Journal of food protection}, year={2013}, volume={76 9}, pages={1488-99} }