Phenotypic Features of Circulating Leukocytes from Non-human Primates Naturally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Resemble the Major Immunological Findings Observed in Human Chagas Disease

@inproceedings{SathlerAvelar2016PhenotypicFO,
  title={Phenotypic Features of Circulating Leukocytes from Non-human Primates Naturally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Resemble the Major Immunological Findings Observed in Human Chagas Disease},
  author={Renato Sathler-Avelar and Danielle Marquete Vitelli-Avelar and Armanda Moreira Mattoso-Barbosa and Marcelo Perdig{\~a}o-de-Oliveira and Ronaldo Peres Costa and Silvana Maria El{\'o}i-Santos and Matheus de Souza Gomes and Laurence Rodrigues do Amaral and Andr{\'e}a Teixeira-Carvalho and Olindo Assis Martins-Filho and Edward J. Dick and Gene B. Hubbard and Jane F Vandeberg and John L Vandeberg and Kenji Hirayama},
  booktitle={PLoS neglected tropical diseases},
  year={2016}
}
BACKGROUND Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) represent a feasible model for research on Chagas disease since natural T. cruzi infection in these primates leads to clinical outcomes similar to those observed in humans. However, it is still unknown whether these clinical similarities are accompanied by equivalent immunological characteristics in the… CONTINUE READING