Phenology of farmland floral resources reveals seasonal gaps in nectar availability for bumblebees

@article{Timberlake2019PhenologyOF,
  title={Phenology of farmland floral resources reveals seasonal gaps in nectar availability for bumblebees},
  author={Tom P. Timberlake and Ian P. Vaughan and Jane Memmott},
  journal={Journal of Applied Ecology},
  year={2019}
}
1.Floral resources are known to be important in regulating wild pollinator populations and are therefore an important component of agri‐environment and restoration schemes which aim to support pollinators and their associated services. However, the phenology of floral resources is often overlooked in these schemes — a factor which may be limiting their success. 2.Our study characterizes and quantifies the phenology of nectar resources at the whole‐farm scale on replicate farms in Southwestern… 
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