Pharyngeal sensation and gag reflex in healthy subjects

@article{Davies1995PharyngealSA,
  title={Pharyngeal sensation and gag reflex in healthy subjects},
  author={A. E. Davies and Sheldon Stone and D. Kidd and James F. Macmahon},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={1995},
  volume={345},
  pages={487-488}
}

Gag reflex and dysphagia

  • S. Leder
  • Medicine, Biology
    Head & neck
  • 1996
The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether absence of a gag reflex is a predictor of dysphagia.

Is the Gag Reflex Useful in the Management of Swallowing Problems in Acute Stroke?

It is concluded that the gag reflex is as specific as but less sensitive than the BSA in detecting dysphagia in acute stroke patients and an intact gag may be protective against longer-term swallowing problems and the need for enteral feeding.

Is the Gag Reflex Useful in the Management of Swallowing Problems in Acute Stroke?

It is concluded that the gag reflex is as specific as but less sensitive than the BSA in detecting dysphagia in acute stroke patients and an intact gag may be protective against longer-term swallowing problems and the need for enteral feeding.

Palatal and pharyngeal reflexes in health and in motor neuron disease.

In healthy adults palatal and pharyngeal sensation and motor responses should be present although considerable variation occurs in the stimulus required, and in patients with motor neuron disease features of impaired swallowing are associated with a brisk rather than a depressed pharynGEal response.

Gag reflex has no role in ability to swallow

A study of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding after acute dysphagic stroke addresses an important subject, but owing to an apparent misunderstanding of the swallowing mechanism the authors have made some fundamental errors that will have affected their results.

The Aetiology of Oro-Pharyngeal Dysphagia and its Effects in Stroke

Dysphagia following stroke is common and its effects may last for many years; without energy, recovery cannot occur and rehabilitation cannot be undertaken.

Swallowing Disorders in the Elderly

The current study is a discussion of the changes that occur in deglutition with normal aging, contemporary evaluation of swallowing function, and some of the common causes of dysphagia in elderly patients.

Mechanisms of airway protection in ageing and Parkinson's disease

To document changes in airway protection with age, in PD and across severity levels of PD, three parallel studies were conducted to assess a series of both motor and sensory airway mechanism.

The correlation of gagging threshold with intraoral tactile and psychometric profiles in healthy subjects: A pilot study.

The results suggested that the tactile sensitivity of the anterior palate is a determining factor for the gagging threshold and implied that the initial response of the oral entry site to stimulation may lead to the development of gag reflex.

Oropharyngeal dysphagia after the acute phase of stroke: predictors of aspiration

  • R. TerréF. Mearin
  • Medicine
    Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
  • 2006
It is concluded that in patients not recovered from severe stroke after the acute phase and with suspected oropharyngeal dysphagia, clinical evaluation is of scant use in predicting aspiration and silent aspiration.
...

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