Pharmacological effects of oximes: how relevant are they?

@article{Helden1996PharmacologicalEO,
  title={Pharmacological effects of oximes: how relevant are they?},
  author={H. V. van Helden and R. Busker and B. Melchers and P. Bruijnzeel},
  journal={Archives of Toxicology},
  year={1996},
  volume={70},
  pages={779-786}
}
Abstract The increased international concern about the threat of military and terroristic use of nerve agents, prompted us to critically consider the expected value of the currently available oxime treatment of nerve agent poisoning. Although oximes have been designed to reactivate the inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE), clinical experience has indicated that they are not always very effective as reactivators and at this very moment none of them can be regarded as a broad-spectrum antidote… Expand
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