Pharmacologic and Nonpharmacologic Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Women

@article{Balk2019PharmacologicAN,
  title={Pharmacologic and Nonpharmacologic Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Women},
  author={Ethan M. Balk and V Rofeberg and Gaelen P. Adam and Hannah J. Kimmel and Thomas A. Trikalinos and Peter C. Jeppson},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2019},
  volume={170},
  pages={465-479}
}
Urinary incontinence (UI), the involuntary loss of urine, affects about 17% of nonpregnant women (1), and its prevalence increases with age, particularly after menopause. Incontinence may have a negative effect on a woman's physical, psychological, and social well-being and may impose substantial lifestyle restrictions. The most common types of UI in women are stress, urgency, and mixed incontinence. Stress UI is the involuntary loss of urine with effort or physical exertion or on sneezing or… 
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  • 2019
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The effectiveness of CBT with a structured manual may not only lead to a new treatment option for patients suffering from OAB symptoms, but may also reduce the social burden by OAB.
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Adverse Events Associated with Nonsurgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Women: a Systematic Review
TLDR
There is low strength of evidence that AEs are rare with behavioral therapies and neuromodulation, and that periurethral bulking agents may result in erosion and increase the risk of voiding dysfunction, but high strength ofEvidence finds that anticholinergics and alpha agonists are associated with high rates of dry mouth and constitutional effects such as fatigue and gastrointestinal complaints.
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