Phagocyte NADPH oxidase, chronic granulomatous disease and mycobacterial infections

@article{Deffert2014PhagocyteNO,
  title={Phagocyte NADPH oxidase, chronic granulomatous disease and mycobacterial infections},
  author={Christine Deffert and Julien Cachat and Karl-Heinz Krause},
  journal={Cellular Microbiology},
  year={2014},
  volume={16}
}
Infection of humans with Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains frequent and may still lead to death. After primary infection, the immune system is often able to control M. tuberculosis infection over a prolonged latency period, but a decrease in immune function (from HIV to immunosenescence) leads to active disease. Available vaccines against tuberculosis are restricted to BCG, a live vaccine with an attenuated strain of M. bovis. Immunodeficiency may not only be associated with an increased risk… Expand
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