Petruchio's "Rope Tricks": "The Taming of the Shrew" and the Renaissance Discourse of Rhetoric

@article{Rebhorn1995PetruchiosT,
  title={Petruchio's "Rope Tricks": "The Taming of the Shrew" and the Renaissance Discourse of Rhetoric},
  author={Wayne A. Rebhorn},
  journal={Modern Philology},
  year={1995},
  volume={92},
  pages={294 - 327}
}
Shortly after Petruchio's first appearance in The Taming of the Shrew, he vows to court Katherine despite her reputation as a shrew "renowned in Padua for her scolding tongue."l His servant Grumio immediately boasts on behalf of his master that all her efforts will be in vain: "She may perhaps call him half a score of knaves or so: why that's nothing; an he begin once, he'll rail in his rope tricks. I'll tell you what, sir, an she stand him but a little, he will throw a figure in her face, and… 
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