Petrosal anatomy in the fossil mammal Necrolestes: evidence for metatherian affinities and comparisons with the extant marsupial mole

@article{Ladevze2008PetrosalAI,
  title={Petrosal anatomy in the fossil mammal Necrolestes: evidence for metatherian affinities and comparisons with the extant marsupial mole},
  author={S. Ladev{\`e}ze and R. Asher and M. S{\'a}nchez-Villagra},
  journal={Journal of Anatomy},
  year={2008},
  volume={213}
}
We present reconstructions of petrosal anatomy based on high‐resolution X‐ray computed tomography scans for the fossil mammal Necrolestes and for the marsupial mole Notoryctes sp. Compared with other mammals, Necrolestes exhibits a mosaic of plesiomorphic and derived characters, but most of the evidence supports its metatherian status. We revised previous descriptions and report on features of phylogenetic or functional significance. Necrolestes exhibits features that support metatherian… Expand
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