Peto's paradox and the promise of comparative oncology

@article{Nunney2015PetosPA,
  title={Peto's paradox and the promise of comparative oncology},
  author={Leonard Nunney and Carlo C. Maley and Matthew Breen and Michael E. Hochberg and Joshua D. Schiffman},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2015},
  volume={370}
}
The past several decades have seen a paradigm shift with the integration of evolutionary thinking into studying cancer. The evolutionary lens is most commonly employed in understanding cancer emergence, tumour growth and metastasis, but there is an increasing realization that cancer defences both between tissues within the individual and between species have been influenced by natural selection. This special issue focuses on discoveries of these deeper evolutionary phenomena in the emerging… 

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