Pet Ownership and Health in Older Adults: Findings from a Survey of 2,551 Community-Based Australians Aged 60–64

@article{Parslow2004PetOA,
  title={Pet Ownership and Health in Older Adults: Findings from a Survey of 2,551 Community-Based Australians Aged 60–64},
  author={Ruth Adeline Parslow and Anthony F Jorm and Helen Christensen and Bryan Rodgers and Patricia A. Jacomb},
  journal={Gerontology},
  year={2004},
  volume={51},
  pages={40 - 47}
}
Background: It is commonly assumed that owning a pet provides older residents in the community with health benefits including improved physical health and psychological well-being. [...] Key Result We found that caring for a pet was associated with negative health outcomes including more symptoms of depression, poorer physical health and higher rates of use of pain relief medication. No relationship was found between pet ownership and use of GP services.Expand
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This cross-sectional study is the first study addressing the public health impact of pet ownership in Southeast Asia and its findings add contextual nuance to suggest potential benefits derived from pet ownership. Expand
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Having a pet has been claimed to have beneficial health effects, but methodologically sound empirical studies are scarce. Small sample sizes and a lack of information about the specific type of petsExpand
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What Are the Benefits of Pet Ownership and Care Among People With Mild-to-Moderate Dementia? Findings From the IDEAL programme
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Having any pet but no involvement in its care was associated with increased depression and decreased QoL compared with those without a pet, and the key factor in the associations was involvement in the care of the pet by the person with dementia. Expand
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