Perspectives Poulton, Wallace and Jordan: How discoveries in Papilio butterflies led to a new species concept 100 years ago

@article{Mallet2004PerspectivesPW,
  title={Perspectives Poulton, Wallace and Jordan: How discoveries in Papilio butterflies led to a new species concept 100 years ago},
  author={James Mallet},
  journal={Systematics and Biodiversity},
  year={2004},
  volume={1},
  pages={441 - 452}
}
  • J. Mallet
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Systematics and Biodiversity
Abstract A hundred years ago, in January 1904, E.B. Poulton gave an address entitled ‘What is a species?’ The resulting article, published in the Proceedings of the Entomological Society of London, is perhaps the first paper ever devoted entirely to a discussion of species concepts, and the first to elaborate what became known as the ‘biological species concept’. Poulton argued that species were syngamic (i.e. formed reproductive communities), the individual members of which were united by… Expand
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