Personality profiles in eating disorders: rethinking the distinction between axis I and axis II.

@article{Westen2001PersonalityPI,
  title={Personality profiles in eating disorders: rethinking the distinction between axis I and axis II.},
  author={Drew Westen and J H Harnden-Fischer},
  journal={The American journal of psychiatry},
  year={2001},
  volume={158 4},
  pages={
          547-62
        }
}
OBJECTIVE Like other DSM-IV axis I syndromes, eating disorders are diagnosed without respect to personality, which is coded on axis II. The authors assessed the utility of segregating eating disorders and personality pathology and examined the extent to which personality patterns account for meaningful variation within axis I eating disorder diagnoses. METHOD One hundred three experienced psychiatrists and psychologists used a Q-sort procedure (the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-200… 

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