Personality and Intelligence: Gender, the Big Five, Self-Estimated and Psychometric Intelligence

@article{Furnham2005PersonalityAI,
  title={Personality and Intelligence: Gender, the Big Five, Self-Estimated and Psychometric Intelligence},
  author={Adrian Furnham and Joanna Moutafi and Tomas Chamorro‐Premuzic},
  journal={Labor: Personnel Economics},
  year={2005}
}
This paper reports on two studies that investigated the relationship between the Big Five personality traits, self-estimates of intelligence (SEI), and scores on two psychometrically validated intelligence tests. In study 1 a total of 100 participants completed the NEO-PI-R, the Wonderlic Personnel Test and the Baddeley Reasoning Test, and estimated their own intelligence on a normal distribution curve. Multiple regression showed that psychometric intelligence was predicted by Conscientiousness… 

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