Personal view: food for thought – western lifestyle and susceptibility to Crohn's disease. The FODMAP hypothesis

@article{Gibson2005PersonalVF,
  title={Personal view: food for thought – western lifestyle and susceptibility to Crohn's disease. The FODMAP hypothesis},
  author={Peter R. Gibson and Susan Joy Shepherd},
  journal={Alimentary Pharmacology \& Therapeutics},
  year={2005},
  volume={21}
}
Susceptibility to the development of Crohn's disease involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The association of Crohn's disease with westernization has implicated lifestyle factors in pathogenesis. While diet is a likely candidate, evidence for specific changes in dietary habits and/or intake has been lacking. 
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