Personal Protective Equipment and Mental Health Symptoms Among Nurses During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

@article{Arnetz2020PersonalPE,
  title={Personal Protective Equipment and Mental Health Symptoms Among Nurses During the COVID-19 Pandemic.},
  author={Judith E Arnetz and Courtney M Goetz and Sukhesh Sudan and Eamonn P Arble and James Janisse and Bengt B. Arnetz},
  journal={Journal of Occupational \& Environmental Medicine},
  year={2020}
}
OBJECTIVE To determine the association between access to adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) and mental health outcomes among a sample of U.S. nurses. METHODS An online questionnaire was administered in May 2020 to Michigan nurses via three statewide nursing organizations (n = 695 respondents). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with mental health symptoms. RESULTS Nurses lacking access to adequate PPE (24.9%, n = 163) were more… Expand
Nurses’ Workplace Conditions Impacting Their Mental Health during COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study
TLDR
Negative ratings of workplace relations, organizational support, organizational preparedness, workplace safety, and access to supplies and resources were associated with higher scores on all of the adverse mental health outcomes included in this study. Expand
Workplace Cognitive Failure among Nurses during the COVID-19 Pandemic
TLDR
To reduce the risk of cognitive failure, healthcare organizations need to provide nurses with protective equipment and work environments that allow nurses to strengthen their resilience to extreme working conditions. Expand
Occupational health practices among dental care professionals before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.
TLDR
O Ongoing training on infection control, occupational health practices, and PPE usage can prevent the transmission of COVID-19 among dental care professionals and the public. Expand
Investigating the Effective Factors of Using Personal Protective Equipment from the Perspective of Nurses Caring for COVID-19 Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study
TLDR
Environmental factors have the greatest impact on the use of PPE from the perspective of the nurses caring for patients with COVID-19, and managers and healthcare organizations should provide appropriate and adequate PPE to nurses, educate them on proper use, and monitor the process to resolve barriers. Expand
Hospital nurses' moral distress and mental health during COVID‐19
TLDR
It was found that nurses' moral distress was associated with the volume of care for infected patients, access to personal protective equipment, and communication from leaders, which influences longer‐term mental health. Expand
Psychological responses of hospital-based nurses working during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States: A cross-sectional study
TLDR
Hospital-based RNs from the US exhibited over twice the rates of trauma and nearly double the rate of depressive symptoms than shown in reports from hospital workers globally during the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Expand
Nurse Reports of Stressful Situations during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Qualitative Analysis of Survey Responses
TLDR
Perceptions of the most salient sources of stress in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic in a sample of U.S. nurses were explored and six distinct themes emerged: exposure/infection-self; illness/death-others; workplace; personal protective equipment/supplies; unknowns; opinions/politics. Expand
Factors affecting frontline Korean nurses’ mental health during the COVID‐19 pandemic
TLDR
Caring for patients with COVID‐19 had a negative impact on fear, anxiety and depressive symptoms of nurses, however, the higher was the perceived hospital safety climate, the lower were the nurses’ psychological symptoms. Expand
Perceived stress and burden of caregiving among nurses in the United Arab Emirates during the COVID-19 pandemic
Objective: To examine the perceived stress and burden of caregiving during the COVID-19 pandemic among nurses in the United Arab Emirates. Method: A descriptive survey was conducted in two selectedExpand
Does the Type of Exposure to Workplace Violence Matter to Nurses’ Mental Health?
TLDR
The results showed that mental-health problems increased with cumulative exposure; even though nurses with solely indirect exposure to workplace violence did not report greater mental- health problems, those experiencing solely direct exposure, or both direct and indirect exposure, were two to four times more likely to report high levels of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression and burnout compared to their counterparts with no exposure. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES
Impact on mental health and perceptions of psychological care among medical and nursing staff in Wuhan during the 2019 novel coronavirus disease outbreak: A cross-sectional study
TLDR
Although staff accessed limited mental healthcare services, distressed staff nonetheless saw these services as important resources to alleviate acute mental health disturbances and improve their physical health perceptions, emphasize the importance of being prepared to support frontline workers through mental health interventions at times of widespread crisis. Expand
Factors Associated With Mental Health Outcomes Among Health Care Workers Exposed to Coronavirus Disease 2019
TLDR
Among Chinese health care workers exposed to COVID-19, women, nurses, those in Wuhan, and front-line health care Workers have a high risk of developing unfavorable mental health outcomes and may need psychological support or interventions. Expand
Generalized anxiety disorder, depressive symptoms and sleep quality during COVID-19 outbreak in China: a web-based cross-sectional survey
TLDR
This study identified a major mental health burden of the public during the COVID-19 outbreak as young people, people spending too much time thinking about the outbreak, and healthcare workers were at high risk of mental illness. Expand
The PHQ-9
TLDR
In addition to making criteria-based diagnoses of depressive disorders, the PHQ-9 is also a reliable and valid measure of depression severity, which makes it a useful clinical and research tool. Expand
Abbreviated PTSD Checklist (PCL) as a guide to clinical response.
TLDR
Whereas prior research has shown the two-item or six-item versions of the PCL to be good PTSD screening instruments for primary care settings, the six- item version appears to be the better alternative for tracking treatment-related change. Expand
Age Differences in COVID-19 Risk Perceptions and Mental Health: Evidence From a National U.S. Survey Conducted in March 2020
  • W. Bruine de Bruin
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
  • 2020
TLDR
U.S. adults who were relatively older appeared to have a more optimistic outlook and better mental health during the early stages of the pandemic, and interventions may be needed to help people of all ages maintain realistic perceptions of the risks, while also managing depression and anxiety during the COVID-19 crisis. Expand
Supporting the Health Care Workforce During the COVID-19 Global Epidemic.
TLDR
COVID-19 is thought to have higher mortality than seasonal influenza, even as wide variation is reported, and the pressure on the global health care workforce continues to intensify. Expand
Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care: Prevalence, Impairment, Comorbidity, and Detection
TLDR
A large primary carebased anxiety study is analyzed to ascertain commonalities among anxiety diagnoses that are traditionally considered to be discrete and to determine whether a single measure can be used as a first step, common metric. Expand
A 4-item measure of depression and anxiety: validation and standardization of the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4) in the general population.
TLDR
Results from this study support the reliability and validity of thePHQ-4, PHQ-2, and GAD-2 as ultra-brief measures of depression and anxiety in the general population and can be used to compare a subject's scale score with those determined from a general population reference group. Expand
An abbreviated PTSD checklist for use as a screening instrument in primary care.
TLDR
It is found that both two-item and six-item versions of the PTSD Checklist-civilian version have adequate psychometric properties for screening purposes and suggest that the selection of one version over the other depends on the specific needs of each primary care clinic. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...