Persistent area socioeconomic disparities in U.S. incidence of cervical cancer, mortality, stage, and survival, 1975–2000

@article{Singh2004PersistentAS,
  title={Persistent area socioeconomic disparities in U.S. incidence of cervical cancer, mortality, stage, and survival, 1975–2000},
  author={Gopal K. Singh and Barry A. Miller and Benjamin F. Hankey and Brenda K. Edwards},
  journal={Cancer},
  year={2004},
  volume={101}
}
Temporal cervical cancer incidence and mortality patterns and ethnic disparities in patient survival and stage at diagnosis in relation to socioeconomic deprivation measures have not been well studied in the United States. The current article analyzed temporal area socioeconomic inequalities in U.S. cervical cancer incidence, mortality, stage, and survival. 
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