Persistence of bat defence reactions in high Arctic moths (Lepidoptera)

@article{Rydell2000PersistenceOB,
  title={Persistence of bat defence reactions in high Arctic moths (Lepidoptera)},
  author={Jens Rydell and Heikki Roininen and Kenelm W. Philip},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2000},
  volume={267},
  pages={553 - 557}
}
We investigated the bat defence reactions of three species of moths (Gynaephora groenlandica, Gynaephora rossi (Lymantriidae) and Psychophora sabini (Geometridae)) in the Canadian Arctic archipelago. Since these moths inhabit the Arctic tundra and, therefore, are most probably spatially isolated from bats, their hearing and associated defensive reactions are probably useless and would therefore be expected to disappear with ongoing adaptation to Arctic conditions. When exposed to bat–like… Expand
Diel flight periodicity and the evolution of auditory defences in the Macrolepidoptera
TLDR
Ultrasound sensitivity not only appears to protect eared moths from aerial predators (bats) but also protects them from terrestrial predators by allowing the moths to remain in the air during the night, and, it is suggested, is responsible for the success of this group of Macrolepidoptera. Expand
Extinction of the acoustic startle response in moths endemic to a bat‐free habitat
TLDR
It is concluded that the absence of bats in this habitat has caused the neural circuitry that normally controls the ASR behaviour in bat‐exposed moths to become decoupled from the functionally vestigial ears of endemic Tahitian moths. Expand
Day-flying butterflies remain day-flying in a Polynesian, bat-free habitat
  • J. Fullard
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2000
TLDR
It is concluded that living in a bat–released habitat has not produced nocturnal flight in nymphalid butterflies and suggests that physiological adaptations currently constrain these insects to diurnal flight. Expand
Lepidoptera (Insecta) of polar deserts
TLDR
The most important adaptations of Lepidoptera, as well as of other arthropod groups, to inhabiting the polar deserts are polyphagy and the capacity for perennial development, with female flight reduced or absent. Expand
Evolutionary escalation: the bat–moth arms race
TLDR
The evolutionary history of bats and eared insects, focusing on the insect order Lepidoptera, is reviewed, and the evidence for antipredator adaptations and predator counter-adaptations are considered. Expand
Species-specific strategies increase unpredictability of escape flight in eared moths
TLDR
This work shows species-specific and size-independent differences in both overall flight strength and change of flight strength over time, confirming the escape-tactic diversity hypothesis for eared moths and shows strong inter-individual differences in evasive flight within some species. Expand
Defence behaviour against brood parasitism is deeply rooted in mainland and island scrub-jays
TLDR
Ejection behaviour may have been maintained this long in the absence of parasitism, but it is possible that scrub-jays were parasitized as recently as the end of the Pleistocene 10 000 years ago, when cowbirds were more abundant. Expand
Persistence and regression of hearing in the exclusively diurnal moths, Trichodezia albovittata (Geometridae) and Lycomorpha pholus (Arctiidae)
Abstract.  1. Auditory sensitivities and ultrasound avoidance behaviour of two exclusively diurnal moths were examined to test the prediction that total isolation from the predatory effects ofExpand
Species‐specific strategies increase unpredictability of escape flight in eared moths
TLDR
This work shows species‐specific and size‐independent differences in both overall flight strength and change of flight strength over time, supporting the escape‐tactic diversity hypothesis for eared moths and showing strong interindividual differences in evasive flight within some species. Expand
Determining Circadian Response of Adult Male Acrobasis nuxvorella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) to Synthetic Sex Attractant Pheromone Through Time-Segregated Trapping with a New Clockwork Timing Trap
TLDR
The study shows that pecan nut casebearer males become responsive to pheromone several hours before females start calling and remain responsive for at least 1 h after they stop, conforms to studies of other polygamous Lepidoptera in which a selective advantage is conferred on early responding males in scramble competition for available females. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 43 REFERENCES
Hearing and bat defence in geometrid winter moths
TLDR
Audiograms and behavioural responses to ultrasound reveal that male geometrid winter moths, which have large wings and a slow flight, have good, broadly tuned ultrasonic hearing with best frequencies at 25–40 kHz, coinciding with the frequencies used by most sympatric aerial–hawking bats. Expand
Auditory changes in noctuid moths endemic to a bat‐free habitat
TLDR
It is concluded that endemic moths at this site exhibit preliminary stages of deafness and that, considering their small cellular investment, ears in moths will be lost at a slower rate than more complex sensory organs. Expand
The influence of parasitism on the life history of a high arctic insect, Gynaephora groenlandica (Wöcke) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae)
TLDR
The life history of Gynaephora groenlandica was studied in the high arctic at Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island and peak of activity of adult parasitoids coincided with inactivity of Gwneephora larvae during July. Expand
HOARY BAT (LASIURUS CINEREUS)
TLDR
Growth constant of young hoary bats is less than that documented for most other species breeding in temperate North America and migration habits of L. cinereus allow adults and young of the year to forage throughout winter and may be associated with slow growth in this species and production of relatively large litters in species of Lasiurus in general. Expand
Rapid decline of host defences in response to reduced cuckoo parasitism: behavioural flexibility of reed warblers in a changing world
TLDR
On Wicken Fen and nearby watercourses eastern England, parasitism by cuckoos, Cuculus canorus, declined from 26% and 16% of reed warbler nests in 1985 and 1986 to 2 to 6% of nests in 1995 to 1997, owing to a decline in cuckoo. Expand
EVOLUTION OF WING REDUCTION IN CRANE FLIES (DIPTERA : TIPULIDAE)
  • George Vv Byers
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1969
TLDR
Wing reduction may be seen in most orders of pterygotes and among species in a variety of ecological situations, in several species within a genus, or in all the species of a genus or higher taxon, suggesting that wing reduction has occurred at several different times during the evolution of the insects and that it may occur in response to diverse environmental factors. Expand
Responses of nonflying moths to ultrasound: the threat of gleaning bats
TLDR
Stationary and walking tympanate moths exhibited discrete behavioural responses to electronically simulated bat echolocation calls, suggesting that such behavioural responses by nonvolant moths to ultrasound may protect them from predation by gleaning bats. Expand
Auditory characteristics and sexual dimorphism in the gypsy moth
TLDR
It is suggested that male L. dispar possess adaptively functional ears tuned to the frequencies in the echo‐location signals of bats but that the flightless females of this species are not exposed to bat predation and therefore possess ears in a state of evolutionary degeneration. Expand
Bat-deafness in day-flying moths (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae, Dioptinae)
TLDR
The phylogeny of the Notodontidae suggests that bat-deaf ears of dioptines represent a state of advanced auditory degeneration brought about by their diurnal life history, and that this deafness is a derived (apomorphic) condition and not a retention of a primitive, insensitive state. Expand
Arthropods of the Bleakest Barren Lands: Composition and Distribution of the Arthropod Fauna of the Northwestern Queen Elizabeth Islands
The Northwestern Queen Elizabeth Islands, i.e., Meighen, Ellef Ringnes, Amund Ringnes, King Christian, Lougheed, Borden, Mackenzie King, and Brock, constitute the most barren part of the high arcticExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...