Persistence and regression of hearing in the exclusively diurnal moths, Trichodezia albovittata (Geometridae) and Lycomorpha pholus (Arctiidae)

@article{Muma2004PersistenceAR,
  title={Persistence and regression of hearing in the exclusively diurnal moths, Trichodezia albovittata (Geometridae) and Lycomorpha pholus (Arctiidae)},
  author={Katherine E. Muma and James H. Fullard},
  journal={Ecological Entomology},
  year={2004},
  volume={29}
}
Abstract.  1. Auditory sensitivities and ultrasound avoidance behaviour of two exclusively diurnal moths were examined to test the prediction that total isolation from the predatory effects of echolocating bats will result in the regression of these sensory systems and/or the defences they evoke. 
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