Peripheral arterial disease: Clinical assessment and indications for revascularization in the patient with diabetes

@article{Muhs2005PeripheralAD,
  title={Peripheral arterial disease: Clinical assessment and indications for revascularization in the patient with diabetes},
  author={Bart E. Muhs and Paul Gagne and Peter Sheehan},
  journal={Current Diabetes Reports},
  year={2005},
  volume={5},
  pages={24-29}
}
Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an under-recognized complication of diabetes. Recently, prevalence estimates in patients with diabetes over 50 years of age have been placed at 25% to 30%. The main reason for under-reporting is the largely asymptomatic nature of PAD in diabetes. Nonetheless, it is important to diagnose PAD because it is a marker of systemic atherosclerosis with excess cardiovascular risk, and it may identify a patient who may develop progressive disability and risk of limb… 

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