• Corpus ID: 49064499

Peripheral Influences on the Movement of the Legs in a Walking Insect Carausius Morosus

@article{Cruse1982PeripheralIO,
  title={Peripheral Influences on the Movement of the Legs in a Walking Insect Carausius Morosus},
  author={Holk Cruse and Steven Epstein},
  journal={The Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={1982},
  volume={101},
  pages={161-170}
}
Anterior extreme position (AEP) and posterior extreme position (PEP)of the legs of stick insects were measured during walking on a tread wheelor on a slippery glass plate. In several experiments, either protraction or retraction of a middle or hind leg was interrupted. The AEP of ot her legs was independent of a protraction interruption but PEP was displaced backward in the leg anterior to the interrupted leg. When a leg was standing on a fixed platform (interruption of retraction) no changes… 

Figures from this paper

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