Peripheral, but not central effects of cannabidiol derivatives: Mediation by CB1 and unidentified receptors

@article{Fride2005PeripheralBN,
  title={Peripheral, but not central effects of cannabidiol derivatives: Mediation by CB1 and unidentified receptors},
  author={Ester Fride and Datta E. Ponde and Aviva Breuer and Lum{\'i}r Ondřej Hanu{\vs}},
  journal={Neuropharmacology},
  year={2005},
  volume={48},
  pages={1117-1129}
}

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