Periodontal diseases at the transition from the late antique to the early mediaeval period in Croatia.

@article{Vodanovi2012PeriodontalDA,
  title={Periodontal diseases at the transition from the late antique to the early mediaeval period in Croatia.},
  author={Marin Vodanovi{\'c} and Kristina Pero{\vs} and Amila Zukanovi{\'c} and Marjana Kne{\vz}evi{\'c} and Mario Novak and Mario {\vS}laus and Hrvoje Brki{\'c}},
  journal={Archives of oral biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={57 10},
  pages={
          1362-76
        }
}
OBJECTIVE We tested the hypothesis that the transition from the late antique to the early mediaeval period in Croatia had a negative impact on the periodontal health. METHODS 1118 skulls were examined for dental calculus, alveolar bone resorption, fenestrations, dehiscences and root furcation involvement. RESULTS The prevalence of teeth with calculus varied from 40.7% in the LA sample of continental parts of Croatia to 50.3% in the LA sample of Adriatic Croatia. The prevalence of alveolar… Expand
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